Julia Roberts is most known as a successful actress, Oscar winner, and producer. However, very few know that in addition to her Hollywood career, she loves to read. In an interview, I recently read Jualia Roberts share her passion for reading and reveal that together with her three kids and husband Danny Moder, they are what we say “book people”. Julia’s passion for books is so strong that unlike her famous colleagues, she prefer to spend “those nice, cozy, very short hours before bed” with her family, sharing the day and reading books.”

So let us take a look and check Julia’s Roberts Bookshelf , complete with publishers’ descriptions.

#1. The Wild Palms by William Faulkner:

Why Julia Roberts recommends the book?

In a 2001 interview with O, The Oprah Magazine, Roberts says of this Faulkner classic, “The Wild Palms would have to be my favourite classic novel. It’s such a beautiful, tragic love story — a book that will just destroy you.

Publisher description:

In this feverishly beautiful novel — originally titled If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem by Faulkner, and now published in the authoritative Library of America text — William Faulkner interweaves two narratives, each wholly absorbing in its own right, each subtly illuminating the other. In New Orleans in 1937, a man and a woman embark on a headlong flight into the wilderness of illicit passion, fleeing her husband and the temptations of respectability. In Mississippi ten years earlier, a convict sets forth across a flooded river, risking his own chance at freedom to rescue a pregnant woman. From these separate stories Faulkner composes a symphony of deliverance and damnation, survival and self-sacrifice, a novel in which elemental danger is juxtaposed with fatal injuries of the spirit. The Wild Palms is grandly inventive, heart-stopping in its prose, and suffused on every page with the physical presence of the country that Faulkner made his own.

#2. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng:

Why Julia Roberts recommends the book?

She just loves this book.

Publisher description:

Lydia is dead. But they don’t know this yet… So begins the story of this exquisite debut novel, about a Chinese American family living in 1970s small-town Ohio. Lydia is the favourite child of Marilyn and James Lee; their middle daughter, a girl who inherited her mother’s bright blue eyes and her father’s jet-black hair. Her parents are determined that Lydia will fulfill the dreams they were unable to pursue — in Marilyn’s case that her daughter become a doctor rather than a homemaker, in James’s case that Lydia be popular at school, a girl with a busy social life and the center of every party.

When Lydia’s body is found in the local lake, the delicate balancing act that has been keeping the Lee family together tumbles into chaos, forcing them to confront the long-kept secrets that have been slowly pulling them apart. James, consumed by guilt, sets out on a reckless path that may destroy his marriage. Marilyn, devastated and vengeful, is determined to find a responsible party, no matter what the cost. Lydia’s older brother, Nathan, is certain that the neighborhood bad boy Jack is somehow involved. But it’s the youngest of the family — Hannah — who observes far more than anyone realizes and who may be the only one who knows the truth about what happened.

A profoundly moving story of family, history, and the meaning of home, Everything I Never Told You is both a gripping page-turner and a sensitive family portrait, exploring the divisions between cultures and the rifts within a family, and uncovering the ways in which mothers and daughters, fathers and sons, and husbands and wives struggle, all their lives, to understand one another.

#3. Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert:

Why Julia Roberts recommends the book?

Even before Julia Roberts starred in the 2010 film based on Elizabeth Gilbert’s bestselling memoir, she was a fan of the book.

Publisher description:

Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat Pray Love touched the world and changed countless lives, inspiring and empowering millions of readers to search for their own best selves.

In her early 30s, Elizabeth Gilbert had everything a modern American woman was supposed to want — husband, country home, successful career — but instead of feeling happy and fulfilled, she was consumed by panic and confusion. This wise and rapturous book is the story of how she left behind all these outward marks of success, and set out to explore three different aspects of her nature, against the backdrop of three different cultures: pleasure in Italy, devotion in India, and on the Indonesian island of Bali, a balance between worldly enjoyment and divine transcendence.

#4. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers:

Why Julia Roberts recommends the book?

In her “Books that Made a Difference” interview with Omagazine, Roberts talks about how the McCullers classic speaks to her southern roots: “One of the most amazing books I ever read was The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. McCullers was southern, and I’m southern. I wonder how much a non-southern person can appreciate some of the nuances that I consider very specific to that part of the country.”

Publisher description:

With the publication of her first novel, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers, all of 23, became a literary sensation. With its profound sense of moral isolation and its compassionate glimpses into its characters’ inner lives, the novel is considered McCullers’ finest work, an enduring masterpiece first published by Houghton Mifflin in 1940. At its center is the deaf-mute John Singer, who becomes the confidant for various types of misfits in a Georgia mill town during the 1930s. Each one yearns for escape from small town life. When Singer’s mute companion goes insane, Singer moves into the Kelly house, where Mick Kelly, the book’s heroine (and loosely based on McCullers), finds solace in her music. Wonderfully attuned to the spiritual isolation that underlies the human condition, and with a deft sense for racial tensions in the South, McCullers spins a haunting, unforgettable story that gives voice to the rejected, the forgotten, and the mistreated — and, through Mick Kelly, gives voice to the quiet, intensely personal search for beauty. Richard Wright praised Carson McCullers for her ability “to rise above the pressures of her environment and embrace white and black humanity in one sweep of apprehension and tenderness.” She writes “with a sweep and certainty that are overwhelming,” said the New York Times. McCullers became an overnight literary sensation, but her novel has endured, just as timely and powerful today as when it was first published. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter is Carson McCullers at her most compassionate, endearing best.

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